Archive | February, 2017

Van has finished reading…The Wild Air by Rebecca Mascull

2 Feb

As Rebecca Mascull’s last book, Song Of The Sea Maid, almost made it into my top five reads of 2016 you can imagine how excited I was to read her new book, The Wild Air. That excitement was well-met from the first page. A short prologue introduces us to Della Dobbs, and in the process does everything a prologue should. We get a goodly flavour of Della’s character but because the language is tight and clear and visual we get atmosphere too, and jeopardy, right from the first line. But above all we get questions. The who and the how and the why abound so that there was nothing I wanted more than to rip into the next chapter and find the answers.

If you’re of a writerly persuasion it’s a lesson in how to do prologues well.

Like Dawnay Price from Song Of The Sea Maid, as a character Della Dobbs is a winner. Though there are undeniable similarities between the two, Della is no carbon copy. Hers is not the blistering intelligence, not the thrusting presence of Dawnay. She is no less capable, no less driven once she understands her goal but Della’s is the quiet determination, the steady faith in her ability, her practicality. Where Dawnay tended to stand out, Della is likely to feel like someone you already know. Where Dawnay would not be bound by her orphan status, Della is shaped in the bosom of the family. And where Dawnay was so much a woman out of time, Della is unmistakably a woman of her time. Dawnay and Aunt Betty would be a house on fire (and woe betide anyone who’d stand in their path!) but I suspect Della would be cowed to silence by Dawnay’s forthright manner – at least until they got around to discussing the science of flight. Regardless, Della is without doubt a protagonist to get behind and cheer all the way, through battles big and small.

The story itself is – for want of a better term – grounded. Belief is never stretched, either in terms of plot or character, and this has to be down to the extensive research that supports the book. If I were to pinpoint a particular skill in the writing I would say that Rebecca Mascull’s has a gift for hiding the research. All the detail, all the intricacy around the early days of flight, the science of it, the mechanics of it, the many descriptions of being in the air in various planes never gets dull because we see it all through the eyes of those in the moment. The exhilaration, or fear, or crippling fatigue – whatever it is the pilot feels becomes the lens through which the technicalities are filtered. At the heart of it all it allows the book to remain what it must be: a thoroughly engaging and very human story.

 

How sad both Della and Dawnay would be to witness 2017 – a hundred years beyond Della’s story and a full 270 beyond Dawnay’s – and discover that history’s extraordinary women still await their rightful place in the light, or that just 3% of pilots internationally are women. As much as we like to look at these characters and empathise with them as they flex against their constraints, and cheer them when they win through, and nod knowingly and commiserate when they don’t, it’s a falsehood to imagine things are different now. These times are not nearly as enlightened as we like to think. I see it in my own thoughts sometimes, those sentences that begin, ‘how amazing that she…’ Would I have found it as amazing if it were a he? How much of this constraint do we perpetuate ourselves? Luckily, we have writers and books to show us these things, to stop us and force us to think. Both Song Of the Sea Maid and The Wild Air gave me more than just a good story, they also took my thoughts beyond the last page. I recommend them both. See if they can do the same for you.

The Wild Air is published by Hodder & Stoughton on 6th April 2017 ISBN:9781473604438

You can find Rebecca on Twitter @RebeccaMascull and on the web at rebeccamascull.tumblr.com