Tag Archives: Sarah Day

Van has finished reading…Mussolini’s Island by Sarah Day

1 Aug

mussolini

There is something very powerful about a quiet rendering of the suffering people can inflict on one another. For all the weight of stories told about and around the second world war, for all the bravery and degradation, the great suffering and little hard-won joys it’s the quiet ones that linger in the memory. Not just for its period and location I’m reminded of Virginia Baily’s superb Early One Morning, and Lissa Evans’ Crooked Heart. Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life. Sarah Day’s Mussolini’s Island is one of the quiet ones.

1939. Catania’s streets are quiet. Even before the knock at the door, he knows. For Francesco there is no escape as the police run him down, the disgust on their voices clear as he is taken. ‘Arrusu’, they call him, the word all sneer and spittle. But Francesco is not the only one. All over the city young homosexuals are being rounded up. Someone has betrayed them, but who? Once interned together on San Domino, the hunt begins for the mole while the authorities seek the perpetrator of another crime. While Francesco feels he has lost everything there is more at stake than he can imagine.

Sarah Day’s Mussolini’s Island is a sensitive, thought-provoking and wholly unsentimental story of love, loss and betrayal.

 

I love the characterisation in this book. The author’s restraint is impeccable and it’s this, I think that allows so many individuals to stand alone in what is quite a crowded cast. Impressions build over time to form a picture and this gives the imagination room to fill in around the descriptions. Nothing feels out of place, no action introduced simply to aid the plot or build a scene and, while it may not be a complete surprise come the end of the book for me it’s all the more satisfying that the journey is such a complete one. It’s this, too that allows the reader to feel not just for Francesco and his companions but for Elena too and, yes, even Pirelli at times. There’s an honesty in the rendering of these people that is truly touching.

Sarah Day sets the scene on San Domino exquisitely. She uses all her characters’ senses to paint a vivid landscape, and beyond that too the flavour of what it’s like for the island’s inhabitants to live there. Islanders and prisoners alike are hemmed by a fatalistic mien, and the shadow of fascism looms over everyone, fuelling their paranoia. War rages in Europe. Everybody counts the days until Italy will join the fray, though the ghost of defeat at Caporetto in the First World War haunts both those who were there and those who were not. Claustrophobia stalks Day’s prose.

 

It’s easy sometimes to look at stories like this with a knowing eye – to feel their power, yes, to empathise with those who suffered, but from a safe distance and through the filter of fiction. But these were real people. Okay, yes, as Sarah Day says in her author’s note, all but two of the characters are invented, but ‘confino’ is not. The idea that homosexuality could be contracted like a disease really was there. People were rounded up, beaten, interned and much worse because of their sexuality. And before we get all holier than thou about it let’s remember that homosexuality was a criminal offence in this country too, that it would be another 28 years before it was even partially decriminalised here.

But look at Day’s description of Francesco’s feelings, his fears and desires. One of the real joys of this book is his coming to terms with what he feels and how right it is, how it couldn’t be anything else, anyone else.

How is that any different to you or me?

 

Mussolini’s Island was published by Tinder Press on 23rd February 2017 ISBN:9781472238191

You can find Sarah Day on Twitter @geowriter or at her website, sarah-day.com

 

My thanks to Millie Seaward at Headline for allowing me to review this book